Archive for BOOK CLUB

The Catcher in the Rye

The Catcher in the Rye

The Catcher in the Rye tells the story of Holden Caulfield, a teenage slacker who has perfected the art of underachievement. During the last days before his expulsion, he searches for an appropriate way to conclude his school experience, but he ends up getting so annoyed with his school and schoolmates that he leaves in the middle of the night on the next train home to New York City.

We read this book because we all knew it was a classic, but weren’t familiar with the story. We had mixed feelings reading it as the language is really very colloquial and the plot doesn’t seem to make much ground, but interestingly after we met and talked about it we all felt that this book still has a lot to offer its readers over 60 years after it was written.

There are some unusual approaches to this novel, and one is that the protagonist isn’t necessarily our favourite character. It’s written in first person, and after just a few pages, we that Holden Caulfield is actually a negative, bratty teen whom we probably wouldn’t have much patience for if we were to meet him. We do learn to like him though, as we learn about his unlucky and unhappy life circumstances, and see that he is a good young man with a kind heart and a love for his family. Not a page-turner, but not a hard read either… if that makes sense!!

Water for Elephants

Water for Elephants


This book was the last one we read last year and was enjoyed by all. It’s the story of a young Polish man, Jacob Jankowski, who after short series of unforeseen tragic events, finds himself working for the circus. Being a veterinarian student, he works with the animals and makes himself two particularly special friends: Rosie the elephant and Marlena, the prettiest girl he’s ever seen. Marlena also happens to be the wife of the header trainer, August.

I watched the recently released film version of this story after reading the book and it was just as spectacular. Both book and movie come recommended from Team Boheem. Next book: Catcher in the Rye.
Next book: Water for Elephants

Next book: Water for Elephants

For anyone wondering what book we’re reading next, it’s Water For Elephants by Sara Gruen. Get amongst it people! We’re shooting for a Thursday 8th September afternoon cuppa and review.

To Kill a Mockingbird

To Kill a Mockingbird




The most recent book we read for Book Club was the American southern classic, To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee. It was nice timing, too, seeing that the story celebrated its 50th year in print only last year. I’ve just collected a few book cover designs for us all to enjoy; some of them are real and some of them are concepts.

We all thoroughly enjoyed burying ourselves in the lives of Scout, Jem, Atticus and Boo Radly. It’s completely understandable why this book continues to be a favourite for so many people. The language is beautiful, the characters endearing and the themes poignant and relevant, 50 years on.
Next Book Club Book

Next Book Club Book

Just a quickie: We’ve decided on the next book club book, and it’s (drum roll please): To Kill A Mockingbird. We’ll probably shoot for a late January meeting. Clients and friends most welcome, please let us know if you’d like to come along!

The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo

The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo

We’re allowing ourselves a little more time these days for our book club reads. We need to allow some time in our lives for being creative, right?!
So we’ve all just finished reading The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, by Stieg Larsson. Generally speaking, we really enjoyed it and would recommend it to anyone wanting an entertaining page-turner. The book is basically about a journalist by the name of Mikael Blomkvist, who takes a year out of his life to help an old guy Henrick Vanger solve the mystery of what happened to his niece Harriet, who went missing 40 years prior. Lisbeth Salander is the one with the dragon tattoo, and she joins forces with Blomkvist in this whodunnit.
Heads up for those who haven’t read it yet that there are a few not-so-nice scenes… I’m not very brave with scary stories though! Hot tip would be to skip the first chapter altogether about the Wennerström affair – all you need to know is that Blomkvist has been framed and is heading to prison for a couple of months. The details are a bit tedious and not a great start to an otherwise easy read.
A few unresolved sub-plots we thought, and we reflected that the biblical references which had started about a third of the way through the book would continue to some kind of climax, but instead disappointingly those themes tapered off. Blomkvist is the protagonist, but we really relate to Salander more, whose thoughts and feelings we end up getting more insight to.
A recommended holiday read for the summer!
Oscar & Lucinda

Oscar & Lucinda

Some of us like to think that we were amongst the more academic elite at school, and how we scoffed at the simplicity of the cheap page-turner that was “The Time Traveler’s Wife”. This book, Oscar and Lucinda, brought each member of the Boheem Team back to reality: we’re perhaps not actually that keen for a literary challenge after all. We liked the idea of pouring over an Australian Classic like this one more than, we have to admit, the actual act of absorbing the words on paper. Kass observed one day in the studio that she found herself getting to the end of a page and then realising she hadn’t paid attention to a single detail… and ashamedly we could all relate.

Since we had been bold enough to invite St John client Ellen Gregory to our group, we felt some responsibility to at least try. Claire watched the film at 11pm the night before our book club meeting – a wonderful Aussie make, incidentally, if you’ll really never read the book.
Between us we had all read enough of the book (or at least the Cliff Notes) to chat about it. Together we worked through the unusual story and its very complex and peculiar characters, and and marvelled at Peter Carey’s genius as we discovered the delicate parallels he made between the fragility of Oscar’s life and the glass with which he worked. We also enjoyed the historical context within which this book was set; it was nice to imagine old Sydney town in the time of horses and carts and sinking glass church/rafts. It seems like this is a book which, for anyone who is prepared to invest themselves into reading it, offers high reward. Boheem is, er, unqualified to rate this book.
Next book: The Cat in The Hat, by Dr Seuss
The Time Traveler’s Wife

The Time Traveler’s Wife

The first book for Boheem Book Club was The Time Traveler’s Wife. We chose it because it seems to be a fairly popular read at the moment, and with the film just released it was ‘time’ to find out what it was all about.

The Time Traveler’s Wife is a love story about two people whose lives are overtaken by a genetic disorder: time travelling. As the name of the book suggests, the male protagonist, (Henry) is the one popping in and out of the past, present, and future; and his wife Clare is the one left picking up piles of clothes on the floor when he departs, and pieces of their lives as the confusion between predictability, predestination and hope gets the better of what is otherwise a seemingly normal, mostly healthy marriage.
We felt that this book was overall an enjoyable read and we’d recommend it to anyone wanting a good yarn. It lacks the more delicate, poetic treatment of a story which jumps around in time which perhaps Michael Ondaatji (for example) has mastered. Its easy reading is a bit of a trade off with depth and resolve, and there are moments when it feels ever so slightly trashy, or even creepy (what exactly was going on between our naked 40-year-old Henry and 8-year-old Clare in her backyard?). Boheem gave this book three stars.
Next Book: Oscar and Lucinda by Peter Carey…