Archive for PLACES

Biennale at Cockatoo Island

Biennale at Cockatoo Island

If you’re looking for something fun AND cultural to do this weekend, Team Boheem highly recommend visiting Cockatoo Island to see the artworks of the Biennale. Here’s Ann’s report, which beautifully compliments Chantel’s pictures:
“With such perfect weather last Friday Cockatoo Island and the 18th Biennale of Sydney beckoned. Add in a free ferry ride with fantastic scenery on the way and what more could you want.
In previous lives Cockatoo Island has been a dockyard, reformatory and an industrial school. It hosts many of the structures still in place which provide amazing spaces for the 50 or so Biennale artworks. Many of the artworks are site specific and on a dramatic scale.
After spending a few hours wandering around my 3 favourites were all housed in the machinery hall:
Peter Robinson’s giant polystyrene chains and hewn rocks were transfixing. They presented a contraction…. items normally linked with weight and strength were light and white. It was big! and I loved the way the chains lazily draped and integrated with the metal structure existing in the building. It must have taken a team of people to put together.
Next on the favourite list was ‘Domesticated Turf’, a shipping container where the  artist, Cal Lane, has cut out one of the sides and ends into a filagree look arrangement. Lit up, the house look like a lantern. It even has a lawn made up of stencilled chalk patterns that form a carpet leading up to it.
Lastly, an interactive kinetic piece by Philip Beesley. As you move through it the sensors triggered by the touch of a hand causing the delicate plastic feathers, which are like flowers, to open or close. There’s so much to take in… glass bottles containing liquids which look like oil hanging down and large white forms overhead that look like they are gently breathing. Very organic, like a fairyland – the garden paradise in Avatar. A really beautiful and captivating space.
Established in 1973, the Biennale of Sydney is the third oldest international art biennial. It is running through three main venues:
the Museum of Contemporary Art, the Art Gallery of NSW and Cockatoo Island, as well as at satellite sites in the inner city.”
The Cake Pop-up Bar, Fraser Studios

The Cake Pop-up Bar, Fraser Studios

Just one more ‘places’ entry before I return faithfully to all things design. I went to an opening a couple of weeks back at the Fraser Studios, and the atmosphere was positively buzzing. The space is only open for another few weeks and apparently as a last hurrah, they’re serving wine, beer and cider as well as a few tasty morsels from Bourke St Bakery at The Cake pop-up bar Thurs (5-10pm) – Sun (3-10pm) each week until the end of June. It’s right near the Clare Hotel off Broadway.
The Larder, Dulwich Hill

The Larder, Dulwich Hill

Sorry people – I know it seems this blog has become all about new Sydney finds, but there have been so many delightful retail and food spots popping up around the place (at least, my life), that I have to share them.

The Inner West is so hot right now. This unassuming little deli, The Larder, is located at 489 Marrickville Rd, Dulwich Hill. Who knew. The selection of food here is outstanding – pasta, chutneys, tea and coffee, cheeses, sweet treats, breads, plus lots of food I’m not even sure how to pronounce let alone know what it is… selected from suppliers worldwide. If you’re after something obscure and tasty, and a grocery shopping experience which transports you immediately to a small, quaint French country town where your package is lovingly wrapped and handed to you in a rustic brown paper bag, then this is the place to visit.

MONA

MONA

We Australians are all aware that our land is made up of two parts: The Mainland and The Island Below The Mainland. We are all fond of Tasmania and many of us would like to see ourselves at home in a pretty green Tassie Valley, with tasty berries growing in the backyard and a sunny kitchen which wafts aromas of fresh sourdough and tea. We’re all aware that Hobart houses Australia’s most outrageous, awe inspiring art museum too, it’s just getting there which is the problem! For all of you who has the MONA on your list of places to go, here’s my quick review.

Clearly, David Walsh didn’t have enough space in his living room to display the pictures and things he’s been collecting over time. And how exactly does one house an interactive installation of 300 lightbulbs? If you have the money, you pay a few people to build a giant adult art-gallery disneyland to show it off. The building is A-MA-ZING, and whether you’re into art or not, exploring this incredible architectural feat is an experience in itself. The museum spaces are all underground; one has to wander down a spiral staircase or take a tubular lift downwards.

The collection is a little bit funny. Dave Walsh is intrigued by sex, death and poo. But lots of us are I suppose. It’s not the sort of collection which left me feeling inspired, though. This is a particular taste and probably not representative of the most clever contemporary art on the market.

But I’m a designer, and my favourite part by far was the branding. The two symbols, the plus and the cross, are brilliant in their simplicity. They appear in the various marketing material and signage with the same whimsical approach which is applied to the whole museum. They smartly represent ‘old’ and ‘new’, and they exist as little marks which aren’t fabricated icons and they’re not strictly type, either. I love the way they animate on the website, they represent ‘love’ and ‘hate’ on the portable touch-screen devices and how they combine to create an asterisk of sorts for the MONA shop. Just lovely.

Kitchen by Mike

Kitchen by Mike

Upon Kass’s recommendation recently I ventured out to Rosebery to see for myself the visual spectacle that is Kitchen By Mike. I’d like to say I happened upon this wondrous design showroom slash cafe, but in all honesty I had to hunt it down. This amazing little eatery accompanies the Koskela showroom and was opened earlier this year by former Rockpool chef Michael McEnearney. The open plan kitchen means visitors can watch as food is prepared – a handy distraction as the line to be served is a tad slow. Meals are served by portions, ie one would order a $3.50 serving of coleslaw to compliment the $7.50 serving of pork belly. Don’t bother planning your meal choice before you go, though; the menu changes daily according to what fresh produce can be sourced. Although, if you’re keen I believe that their Facebook page is updated regularly with what food can be found.
Get Sidetracked

Get Sidetracked


When I saw the street number on this dear spot in Bowral was my lucky 37, I had a feeling there would be treats in store… and I was right. Sidetracked is the kookier, more industrial sister to main street’s Three Wise Monkeys – and whilst their website gives a nice little sneak peak to their wonderfully curated collection of books, gifts and vintage goodies… Sydney-siders really must make the trip to this very pretty part of the world to see these wonders first hand.